Shakespeare-Oxford Society

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Who was Shakespeare? 9th annual global Authorship Conference in Toronto Oct. 17–20. Sponsored by York and Guelph Universities, conference attracts renowned scholars and premieres two films TORONTO, October 15, 2013 – As millions of students read Shakespeare plays and millions of tourists flock to his birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon each year, a growing number of respected […]

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The Case for Oxford Revisited

Ramon Jiménez In his recent biography of William Shakespeare, the critic Jonathan Bate writes: “Gathering what we can from his plays and poems: that is how we will write a biography that is true to him’ (xix). This statement acknowledges a widely recognized truth—that a writer’s work reflects his milieu, his experiences, his thoughts, and […]

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Who Was Spencer’s EK: Was He the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford?

Nina Green Scholars have never satisfactorily identified the mysterious individual known only as E.K. who collaborated with Spenser on The Shepheardes Calender of 1579 and was the author of a lost commentary on Spenser’s Dreames. The suggestion that E.K. was Edward Kirke (1553-1613), a Cambridge contemporary of Spenser’s, seems to go nowhere through lack of […]

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Hotwiring the Bard into Cyberspace: Insights into automated Forms of Stylistic Analysis Which Attempt to Address Elizabethan Authorship Questions

W. Ron Hess There has long been controversy about who wrote what during the Elizabethan era because there was an extraordinary proclivity among Elizabethan authors to write anonymously or under pseudonyms, to collaborate, and to borrow (or to quote without attribution, what today we would call “to plagiarize”). Therefore, it is not surprising that this […]

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William Byrd’s “Battle” and the Earl of Oxford

by Sally Mosher Among close to three hundred pieces contained in the most famous keyboard manuscript of the English Renaissance, now known as The Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, is William Byrd's “The Earl of Oxford March” (Fitzwilliam II 402). The Oxford March has become well known to present day early music enthusiasts, and apparently was well […]

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Greene’s Groats-worth of Witte: Shakespeare’s Biography?

Frank Davis Few tracts from Shakespeare's time have generated more study, comment and controversy than Greenes Groats-worth of Witte, Bought with a Million of Repentance, Describing the follie of youth, the falshoode of makeshift flatterers, the miserie of the negligent, and mischiefes of deceiuing Courtezans. This curious but important work, posthumously published by Henry Chettle […]

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Shakespeare, Oxford, and “A Pedlar”

James Fitzgerald You can always get a little more literature if you are willing to go a little closer into what has been left unsaid as unspeakable, just as you can always get a little more melon by going a little closer to the rind. Robert Frost The Oxford Book of English Verse, as one […]

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Mathematical Models of Stratfordian Persistence

Dr. Charles Berney The year 1593 saw the publication of the first work attributed to “William Shake-speare, ” the narrative poem Venus and Adonis. Subsequent years saw other publications with this attribution: another poem, a number of plays, a collection of sonnets, and finally, in 1623, a large volume entitled Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, […]

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SHAKESPEARE’S KNOWLEDGE OF LAW

A journey through the history of the argument Mark Andre Alexander Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddities now, his quillets, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks? why does he suffer this rude knave, now, to knock him about the sconce with a dirty shovel, and will […]

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Searching for the Oxfordian “Smoking Gun” in Elizabethan Letters

Paul H. Altrocchi, M.D. I will find where truth is hid, though it were hid indeed within the center. Hamlet: Act II Scene 2 Oxfordian scholars should be commended for excellent research in the past twenty-five years—a very productive quarter century. Other Oxfordians have either been content to wait in the wings for the inevitable […]

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Authorship Clues in Henry VI, Part 3

Eric Lewin Altschuler and William Jansen Some years ago, in an article in Notes & Queries, Philippa Sheppard noted strong similarities between the speech of Prince Edward in Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part 3 (5.4. 44-49) and the famed “St. Crispin’s Day” speech in Henry V (4.3.29-39). Furthermore and interestingly, Sheppard points out that, in light […]

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The Biblical Origin of Edward deVere’s dedicatory Poem in Cardan’s Comforte

Roger Stritmatter We believe that Shakespeare, whose investment in courtly diction was considerable, can be analyzed as a writer who felt, in the course of his production, the ways in which new modes of production and ownership (matched by new manners and style) were arising to endanger his stylistic property, a threatened alienation which he […]

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De Vere’s Lucrece and Romano’s Sala di Troia

Michael Delahoyde To this well-painted piece is Lucrece come, To find a face where all distress is stell’d. Many she sees where cares have carvéd some, But none where all distress and dolour dwell’d Till she despairing Hecuba beheld . . . Lucrece (1441-45) Shakespeare’s two long narrative poems, despite their original popularity in the […]

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Unpacking The Merry Wives

Robert Brazil This article appeared in a slightly different form in the 1999 issue of The Oxfordian Shakespeare’s play, The Merry Wives of Windsor, is filled with fascinating enigmas. Because Merry Wives was first printed in 1602, most standard commentators on Shakespeare consider it to be a mid-career play, written while the author was at […]

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Shakespeare in Scotland: What did the author of Macbeth know and when did he know it?

Richard F. Whalen This article appeared in a slightly different form in the 2003 issue of The Oxfordian Awake! Awake! Ring the alarum-bell:—murder and treason! Banquo and Donalbain! Malcolm! Awake! Shake off this downy sleep, death’s counterfeit, And look on death itself! Macduff: Macbeth: Act II Scene 1 A review of historical documents and topical […]

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Declaration of Reasonable Doubt About the Identity of William Shakespeare

A summary argument of the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition on why the authorship question should be a matter of legitimate concern.

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Shakespeare, IN FACT, by Irvin Matus

A book review by Publius, a professor of Comparative Literature at an Ivy League University who prefers to remain incognito for reasons of professional safety.

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The True Tragedy of Richard the Third: another Early History Play by Edward de Vere

by Ramon Jiménez This article appeared in a slightly different form in the 2004 issue of The Oxfordian The anonymous history play, The True Tragedy of Richard the Third, printed in 1594, has occasionally been cited as a source for Shakespeare’s Richard III, printed in 1597, also anonymously. True Tragedy was not printed again until […]

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Attributing Authorship: An Introduction by Harold Love

Oxfordian scholar Ramon Jiménez reviews Attributing Authorship: An Introduction by Harold Love, professor of English at Monash University in Victoria, Australia. One chapter of Professor Love’s book is devoted to the authorship issue and Mr. Jiménez gives it the incisive analysis that those familiar with his previous reviews have come to expect.

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Three Book Reviews – Bloom, Wells, and Dobson & Wells

Three Stratfordian books are critically reviewed by Oxfordian Ramon Jiménez: Hamlet: Poem Unlimited, by Harold Bloom; Shakespeare: for all time, by Stanley Wells; and, The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare, edited by Michael Dobson and Stanley Wells.

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The Truth Will Out, Unmasking the Real Shakespeare

There are other authorship candidates and the Shakespeare Oxford Society welcomes research on them. This Library publication is an insightful review of a recently published book The Truth Will Out, Unmasking the real Shakespeare by Brenda James and William D. Rubinstein. The review is by Ramon Jimenez, a member of the Shakespeare Oxford Society.

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Is Shakespeare Dead?

By Mark Twain “For the instruction of the ignorant I will make a list, now, of those details of Shakespeare’s history which are FACTS – verified facts, established facts, undisputed facts …. He was born on the 23d of April, 1564. Of good farmer-class parents who could not read, could not write, could not sign […]

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The Honor Roll of Skeptics

Questioning the orthodoxy Doubts about Shaksper of Stratford’s claim to the Shakespeare canon have been around for centuries. Among the many political, literary, cultural and intellectual figures who have recorded their thoughts about the authorship question are… Delia Bacon (1811-1859) “[Shakespeare] carries the court influence with him, unconsciously, wherever he goes… He looks into Arden […]

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History of Doubts surrounding the authorship of Shakespeare’s Works

1728 – Publication of Captain Goulding’s Essay Against Too Much Reading in which he comments on the background Shakespeare would require for his historical plays and suggests that Shakespeare probably had to keep “one of those chuckle-pated Historians for his particular Associate…or he might have starvd upon his History.” Goulding tells us that he had […]

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Demonography 101:
Alan Nelson’s Monstrous Adversary

by Peter R. Moore This article was first published in the Winter 2004 Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter. Professor Alan H. Nelson of the University of California at Berkeley has produced Monstrous Adversary, The Life of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (Liverpool University Press, paperback, 527 pp., $32.00). Nelson’s biography of Oxford offers a mass […]

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